Coronaviruses

Coronaviruses are RNA-viruses that account for approximately 10-20 percent of colds and epidemics of respiratory diseases that occur approximately every four years. Coronaviruses mainly attack mammals and birds. Their genome is made of RNA. Their name comes from the corona-like sheath that appears around virions under an electron microscope.



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coronaviruses

Coronaviruses are microbes that cause various types of infections in the digestive and respiratory systems, both in humans and animals. The first information about coranoviruses appeared in the 1960s, when the pathogens HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43 were discovered, both of which cause a cold of a mild nature that disappears spontaneously after a few days. The lethal variety of the virus appeared only in 2002 in China. This strain causes severe respiratory failure, known over time as SARS. According to WHO data, the SARS epidemic in 2002-2003 killed 916 people. Coronaviruses are RNA viruses. This means that their genome is made of RNA. Their name comes from the corona-like sheath that appears around virions under an electron microscope.
This group includes three subgroups (B814, 229E and OC43), the last two of which cause epidemics of respiratory tract infections. A well-known representative of this group is the aforementioned SARS virus. Coronavirus also includes MERS-CoV (The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus), which has been detected in more than 40 people since September 2012, half of whom have died. The first symptoms of coronavirus infection are usually similar to flu symptoms. There is high fever, headache, sore throat and cough, feeling exhausted, lack of appetite.

Coronaviruses - how do we get infected?

It is believed that the SARS virus appeared as a result of transmission from bats, although it could also be raccoon dogs. The most endangered region where SARS occurs is South-East Asia. However, the assumption that camels are the source of coronaviruses for humans remains valid. Viruses can be localized in the urine, feces, and even respiratory secretions and milk of an infected animal. Direct contact with these secretions may transmit infection. In some situations it is possible for humans to become infected by humans, for example as a result of close contact with sick people or among health workers.