Trek it out in Tenerife

The majority of tourists visit Teide National Park during the day. For those who want to experience a vivid sunset and do a bit of star-gazing – not ruined by light pollution – plan an overnight stay at Parador de Las Cañadas, the only hotel in the highlands. If a more basic option is preferred, there is a trekking hut on the higher slopes of the mountain.

Hiking trails are abundant, and there’s even an exciting activity for thrill-seekers: just catch a ride up to the park, take in the stunning scenery, and then ride down to the base by mountain bike. The curvy asphalt road ends in Los Cristianos, one of Tenerife’s coastal tourist hubs, roughly 50 kilometres away.


Easy way up

Mount Teide (3,718 m) is the highest point of the Canary Islands. The majestic volcano was regarded sacred by the Aboriginal Guanches, and today it is celebrated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Conquering Teide doesn’t require trekking experience: there’s a cable car (teleférico) that carries passengers almost to the top in just a few minutes. Tickets (27 euros) can be bought online in advance.

 

Rough rocks

Roque del Garcia is the second most popular attraction (after Teide’s peak) in the national park. Take note though, early afternoons are notably busy with selfie-taking tourists. A great way to see the rock formation is to hike the two-hour loop trail. The reward is well worth the sweat: breathtaking views and a glimpse of gallotia galloti, small lava lizards.

 

Magical forest

The neighbouring island of La Gomera is just an hour’s ferry ride from Tenerife. The island paradise is famous for its ­fantastic hiking routes. Nothing beats a trek through the vast Garajonay National Park with its legendary dense laurel forests and misty trees that look like they’re wearing moss jackets. A side-trip here is a truly memorable adventure for the entire family.


Tenerife, the largest of Spain’s Canary Islands, is famous for its beach resorts – but it is also a great destination for anyone who enjoys rugged mountain scenery. By rental car it takes only 90 minutes to reach Teide National Park, located in the highlands.

The national park is dominated by Mount Teide, a volcano that rises 3,718 metres (12,198 feet) above sea level. The last eruption was more than one century ago, yet the landscape still bears the scars: petrified lava flows and sharp volcanic rocks resemble the surface of the moon.
Trek it out in Tenerife

Have a look at Tenerife Forum for more info about Tenerife and if you fancy some interesting reading, take a look at this list of articles:
 

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Tenerife - 7 Interesting Facts